Lost in Translation

Or, Cross-cultural communication. What the English say vs. what foreigners hear.

The concept of saying the opposite of what you mean may seem both confusing and unnecessary to many people.

WHAT THE BRITISH SAY WHAT THE BRITISH MEAN WHAT FOREIGNERS UNDERSTAND
I hear what you say I disagree and do not want to discuss it further He accepts my point of view
With the greatest respect You are an idiot He is listening to me
That’s not bad That’s good That’s poor
That is a very brave proposal You are insane He thinks I have courage
Quite good A bit disappointing Quite good
I would suggest Do it or be prepared to justify yourself Think about the idea, but do what you like
Oh, incidentally/ by the way The primary purpose of our discussion is That is not very important
I was a bit disappointed that I am annoyed that It doesn’t really matter
Very interesting That is clearly nonsense They are impressed
I’ll bear it in mind I’ve forgotten it already They will probably do it
I’m sure it’s my fault It’s your fault Why do they think it was their fault?
You must come for dinner It’s not an invitation, I’m just being polite I will get an invitation soon
I almost agree I don’t agree at all He’s not far from agreement
I only have a few minor comments Please rewrite completely He has found a few typos
Could we consider some other options I don’t like your idea They have not yet decided
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Common Word Collocations With: Big, Great, Large, Strong, Deep, Heavy

news_word_cloudIn English, a collocation is two or more words that go together naturally. Learning collocations is essential for making your English sound fluent and natural!

Here are 50 common English collocations with the words big, great, large, strong, deep, and heavy.

The word big is often used in collocations with a happening or event, for example:

  • a big accomplishment
  • a big decision
  • a big disappointment
  • a big failure
  • a big improvement
  • a big mistake
  • a big surprise

 

The word great is often used in collocations with feelings or qualities.

 Great + feelings

  • great admiration
  • great anger
  • great enjoyment
  • great excitement
  • great fun
  • great happiness
  • great joy

Great + qualities

  • in great detail
  • great power
  • great pride
  • great sensitivity
  • great skill
  • great strength
  • great understanding
  • great wisdom
  • great wealth

 

The word large is often used in collocations involving numbers and measurements.

  • a large amount
  • a large collection
  • a large number (of)
  • a large population
  • a large proportion
  • a large quantity
  • a large scale

 

The word strong is often used in collocations with facts and opinions:

 Strong + facts/opinions

  • strong argument
  • strong emphasis
  • strong evidence
  • a strong contrast
  • a strong commitment
  • strong criticism
  • strong denial
  • a strong feeling
  • a strong opinion (about something)
  • strong resistance

 Strong + senses

  • a strong smell
  • a strong taste

 

The word deep is used for some strong feelings:

  • deep depression
  • deep devotion

It is also used in these expressions:

  • in deep thought
  • in deep trouble
  • in a deep sleep (when the person won’t wake up easily)

 

Heavy is used for some weather conditions

  • heavy rain
  • heavy snow
  • heavy fog

The word heavy is also used for people with bad habits:

  • a heavy drinker
  • a heavy smoker
  • a heavy drug user

 

 

50 Collective Nouns to Bolster Your Vocabulary

From www.mentalfloss.com

Collective nouns may seem like quirky ways to describe groups, but 500 years ago, they were your ticket to the in-crowd. Most collective nouns, or “terms of venery,” were coined during the 15th century. Many were codified in books of courtesy, like the 1486 classic Book of St. AlbansSt. Albanswas a handbook for medieval gentlemen, and it contained essays on hawking, hunting, and heraldry. Appended to the hunting chapter sits a list of 164 collective nouns, titled “The Compaynys of Beestys and Fowlys.” (Contrary to the title, many terms actually describe people—a biting example of ye olde satire.)

As silly as some sound today, the phrases were formal and proper descriptions. St. Albans was, after all, a vocabulary-booster, a primer designed to help gentlemen-in-training avoid the embarrassment of “some blunder at the table.” Over the next century, the book’s popularity bloomed. Similar courtesy handbooks caught on, and by the end of the 16th century, a slew of collective nouns had entered the lexicon.

Some have achieved widespread currency and acceptance, like a “flight of stairs,” “a board of trustees,” and a “school of fish.” Others, like a “murder of crows,” barely cling on. However, a handful of obscure phrases have made a comeback, thanks to James Lipton’s wonderful compendium of collective nouns, An Exaltation of Larks. Here are a few from Lipton’s book that you should add to your repertoire.

1. Business of Ferrets

2. Labor of Moles

3. Mustering of Storks

4. Shrewdness of Apes

5. Gam of Whales

6. Smack of Jellyfish

7. Host of Angels

8. Fusillade of Bullets

9. Baptism of Fire

10. Quiver of Arrows

11. Tissue of lies

12. Murder of Crows

13. Unkindness of Ravens

14. Dule of Doves

15. Clowder, Cluster, or Clutter of Cats

16. Kindle of Kittens

17. Mute of Hounds

18. Pass of Asses

19. Ostentation of Peacocks

20. Team of Ducks (when flying)

21. Paddling of Ducks (when on water)

22. Trip of Goats

23. Sloth, or Sleuth, of Bears

24. Charm of Finches

25. Hill of Beans

26. String of Ponies

27. Hand of Bananas

28. College of Cardinals

29. Shock of Corn

30. Band of Men

31. Knot of Toads

32. Wedge of Swans (when flying)

33. Parliament of Owls

34. Superfluity of Nuns

35. Abominable Sight of Monks

36. Untruth of Summoners

37. Doctrine of Doctors

38. Damning of Jurors

39. Sentence of Judges

40. Rascal of Boys

41. Gaggle of Women

42. Gaggle of Gossips

43. Impatience of Wives

44. Tabernacle of Bakers

45. Poverty of Pipers

46. Fighting of Beggars

47. Neverthriving of Jugglers

48. Herd of Harlots

49. Worship of Writers

50. Hastiness of Cooks

According to Lipton, the terms above “are authentic and authoritative. They were used, they were correct, and they are useful, correct—and available—today.” You can pick up a copy of Lipton’s book here.

www.mentalfloss.com