Alot vs. A Lot vs. Allot

First of all, the word “alot” does not exist in the English language.  It is often incorrectly written instead of “a lot”.  You wouldn’t write “afew” or “alittle” so please don’t write “alot”.  It’s “A LOT”.  Two words.

“A lot” can be a noun or adverb.

As a noun, it means to a large extent, large amount, or large number.

  • I have a lot of shoes.
  • There are a lot of people at this party.
  • She puts a lot of effort into her work.

To confirm that “a lot” is a noun, see if you can substitute “a bunch” and still have it make sense.

  • I have a bunch of homework.
  • There are a bunch of people at this party
  • She puts a bunch of effort into her work.

As an adverb, it means to a great extent or degree.

  • He cares a lot about his family.
  • They work a lot.
  • She sure texts a lot.

To confirm that “a lot” is an adverb, see if you can substitute “regularly” and have it still make sense.

  • He cares regularly about his family.
  • They work regularly.
  • She sure texts regularly.

The verb “to allot” means “portion, designate, dedicate, ration, grant, give out, or set aside”.

  • The government will allot 2% of its budget for emergency services.
  • His mother only allots him a half hour of TV a day.
  • The newspaper will allot a full page to each of the mayoral candidates.

And finally, here is a super cute cartoon for the visually inclined.  

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